OSHC

convective parameterization scheme: Topics by Science

  • RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; …

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore » relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model’s shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  • Using the Weak-Temperature Gradient Approximation to Evaluate Parameterizations: An Example of the Transition From Suppressed to Active Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daleu, C. L.; Plant, R. S.; Woolnough, S. J.

    2017-10-01

    Two single-column models are fully coupled via the weak-temperature gradient approach. The coupled-SCM is used to simulate the transition from suppressed to active convection under the influence of an interactive large-scale circulation. The sensitivity of this transition to the value of mixing entrainment within the convective parameterization is explored. The results from these simulations are compared with those from equivalent simulations using coupled cloud-resolving models. Coupled-column simulations over nonuniform surface forcing are used to initialize the simulations of the transition, in which the column with suppressed convection is forced to undergo a transition to active convection by changing the local and/or remote surface forcings. The direct contributions from the changes in surface forcing are to induce a weakening of the large-scale circulation which systematically modulates the transition. In the SCM, the contributions from the large-scale circulation are dominated by the heating effects, while in the CRM the heating and moistening effects are about equally divided. A transition time is defined as the time when the rain rate in the dry column is halfway to the value at equilibrium after the transition. For the control value of entrainment, the order of the transition times is identical to that obtained in the CRM, but the transition times are markedly faster. The locally forced transition is strongly delayed by a higher entrainment. A consequence is that for a 50% higher entrainment the transition times are reordered. The remotely forced transition remains fast while the locally forced transition becomes slow, compared to the CRM.

  • Comments on “A Unified Representation of Deep Moist Convection in Numerical Modeling of the Atmosphere. Part I”

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guang; Fan, Jiwen; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-06-01

    Arakawa and Wu (2013, hereafter referred to as AW13) recently developed a formal approach to a unified parameterization of atmospheric convection for high-resolution numerical models. The work is based on ideas formulated by Arakawa et al. (2011). It lays the foundation for a new parameterization pathway in the era of high-resolution numerical modeling of the atmosphere. The key parameter in this approach is convective cloud fraction. In conventional parameterization, it is assumed that convective cloudmore » fraction can be comparable to unity. Therefore, they argue that the conventional approach to parameterizing convective transport must include a factor 1 – in order to unify the parameterization for the full range of model resolutions so that it is scale-aware and valid for large convective cloud fractions. While AW13’s approach provides important guidance for future convective parameterization development, in this note we intend to show that the conventional approach already has this scale awareness factor 1 – built in, although not recognized for the last forty years. Therefore, it should work well even in situations of large convective cloud fractions in high-resolution numerical models.« less

  • Cabauw experimental results from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, T.H.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; Milly, P.C.D.; Pitman, A.J.; Beljaars, A.C.M.; Polcher, J.; Abramopoulos, F.; Boone, A.; Chang, S.; Chen, F.; Dai, Y.; Desborough, C.E.; Dickinson, R.E.; Dumenil, L.; Ek, M.; Garratt, J.R.; Gedney, N.; Gusev, Y.M.; Kim, J.; Koster, R.; Kowalczyk, E.A.; Laval, K.; Lean, J.; Lettenmaier, D.; Liang, X.; Mahfouf, Jean-Francois; Mengelkamp, H.-T.; Mitchell, Ken; Nasonova, O.N.; Noilhan, J.; Robock, A.; Rosenzweig, C.; Schaake, J.; Schlosser, C.A.; Schulz, J.-P.; Shao, Y.; Shmakin, A.B.; Verseghy, D.L.; Wetzel, P.; Wood, E.F.; Xue, Y.; Yang, Z.-L.; Zeng, Q.

    1997-01-01

    In the Project for Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes phase 2a experiment, meteorological data for the year 1987 from Cabauw, the Netherlands, were used as inputs to 23 land-surface flux schemes designed for use in climate and weather models. Schemes were evaluated by comparing their outputs with long-term measurements of surface sensible heat fluxes into the atmosphere and the ground, and of upward longwave radiation and total net radiative fluxes, and also comparing them with latent heat fluxes derived from a surface energy balance. Tuning of schemes by use of the observed flux data was not permitted. On an annual basis, the predicted surface radiative temperature exhibits a range of 2 K across schemes, consistent with the range of about 10 W m-2 in predicted surface net radiation. Most modeled values of monthly net radiation differ from the observations by less than the estimated maximum monthly observational error (±10 W m-2). However, modeled radiative surface temperature appears to have a systematic positive bias in most schemes; this might be explained by an error in assumed emissivity and by models’ neglect of canopy thermal heterogeneity. Annual means of sensible and latent heat fluxes, into which net radiation is partitioned, have ranges across schemes of 30 W m-2 and 25 W m-2, respectively. Annual totals of evapotranspiration and runoff, into which the precipitation is partitioned, both have ranges of 315 mm. These ranges in annual heat and water fluxes were approximately halved upon exclusion of the three schemes that have no stomatal resistance under non-water-stressed conditions. Many schemes tend to underestimate latent heat flux and overestimate sensible heat flux in summer, with a reverse tendency in winter. For six schemes, root-mean-square deviations of predictions from monthly observations are less than the estimated upper bounds on observation errors (5 W m-2 for sensible heat flux and 10 W m-2 for latent heat flux

  • Cabauw Experimental Results from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. H.; Henderson-Sellers, A.; Milly, P. C. D.; Pitman, A. J.; Beljaars, A. C. M.; Polcher, J.; Abramopoulos, F.; Boone, A.; Chang, S.; Chen, F.; Dai, Y.; Desborough, C. E.; Dickinson, R. E.; Dümenil, L.; Ek, M.; Garratt, J. R.; Gedney, N.; Gusev, Y. M.;  Kim, J.;  Koster, R.;  Kowalczyk, E. A.;  Laval, K.;  Lean, J.;  Lettenmaier, D.;  Liang, X.;  Mahfouf, J.-F.;  Mengelkamp, H.-T.;  Mitchell, K.;  Nasonova, O. N.;  Noilhan, J.;  Robock, A.;  Rosenzweig, C.;  Schaake, J.;  Schlosser, C. A.;  Schulz, J.-P.;  Shao, Y.;  Shmakin, A. B.;  Verseghy, D. L.;  Wetzel, P.;  Wood, E. F.;  Xue, Y.;  Yang, Z.-L.;  Zeng, Q.

    1997-06-01

    In the Project for Intercomparison of Land-Surface Parameterization Schemes phase 2a experiment, meteorological data for the year 1987 from Cabauw, the Netherlands, were used as inputs to 23 land-surface flux schemes designed for use in climate and weather models. Schemes were evaluated by comparing their outputs with long-term measurements of surface sensible heat fluxes into the atmosphere and the ground, and of upward longwave radiation and total net radiative fluxes, and also comparing them with latent heat fluxes derived from a surface energy balance. Tuning of schemes by use of the observed flux data was not permitted. On an annual basis, the predicted surface radiative temperature exhibits a range of 2 K across schemes, consistent with the range of about 10 W m2 in predicted surface net radiation. Most modeled values of monthly net radiation differ from the observations by less than the estimated maximum monthly observational error (±10 W m2). However, modeled radiative surface temperature appears to have a systematic positive bias in most schemes; this might be explained by an error in assumed emissivity and by models’ neglect of canopy thermal heterogeneity. Annual means of sensible and latent heat fluxes, into which net radiation is partitioned, have ranges across schemes of30 W m2 and 25 W m2, respectively. Annual totals of evapotranspiration and runoff, into which the precipitation is partitioned, both have ranges of 315 mm. These ranges in annual heat and water fluxes were approximately halved upon exclusion of the three schemes that have no stomatal resistance under non-water-stressed conditions. Many schemes tend to underestimate latent heat flux and overestimate sensible heat flux in summer, with a reverse tendency in winter. For six schemes, root-mean-square deviations of predictions from monthly observations are less than the estimated upper bounds on observation errors (5 W m2 for sensible heat flux and 10 W m2 for latent heat flux). Actual

  • Sensitivity of a cloud parameterization package in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, C.-Y. J.; Smith, W. S.

    1999-05-01

    A physically based cloud parameterization package, which includes the Arakawa-Schubert (AS) scheme for subgrid-scale convective clouds and the Sundqvist (SUN) scheme for nonconvective grid-scale layered clouds (hereafter referred to as the SUNAS cloud package), is incorporated into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model, Version 2 (CCM2). The AS scheme is used for a more reasonable heating distribution due to convective clouds and their associated precipitation. The SUN scheme allows for the prognostic computation of cloud water so that the cloud optical properties are more physically determined for shortwave and longwave radiation calculations. In addition, the formation of anvil-like clouds from deep convective systems is able to be simulated with the SUNAS package. A 10-year simulation spanning the period from 1980 to 1989 is conducted, and the effect of the cloud package on the January climate is assessed by comparing it with various available data sets and the National Center for Environmental Protection/NCAR reanalysis. Strengths and deficiencies of both the SUN and AS methods are identified and discussed. The AS scheme improves some aspects of the model dynamics and precipitation, especially with respect to the Pacific North America (PNA) pattern. CCM2’s tendency to produce a westward bias of the 500 mbar stationary wave (time-averaged zonal anomalies) in the PNA sector is remedied apparently because of a less “locked-in” heating pattern in the tropics. The additional degree of freedom added by the prognostic calculation of cloud water in the SUN scheme produces interesting results in the modeled cloud and radiation fields compared with data. In general, too little cloud water forms in the tropics, while excessive cloud cover and cloud liquid water are simulated in midlatitudes. This results in a somewhat degraded simulation of the radiation budget. The overall simulated precipitation by the SUNAS package is, however

  • The Influence of Microphysical Cloud Parameterization on Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Wang, James R.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The microphysical parameterization of clouds and rain-cells plays a central role in atmospheric forward radiative transfer models used in calculating passive microwave brightness temperatures. The absorption and scattering properties of a hydrometeor-laden atmosphere are governed by particle phase, size distribution, aggregate density., shape, and dielectric constant. This study identifies the sensitivity of brightness temperatures with respect to the microphysical cloud parameterization. Cloud parameterizations for wideband (6-410 GHz observations of baseline brightness temperatures were studied for four evolutionary stages of an oceanic convective storm using a five-phase hydrometeor model in a planar-stratified scattering-based radiative transfer model. Five other microphysical cloud parameterizations were compared to the baseline calculations to evaluate brightness temperature sensitivity to gross changes in the hydrometeor size distributions and the ice-air-water ratios in the frozen or partly frozen phase. The comparison shows that, enlarging the rain drop size or adding water to the partly Frozen hydrometeor mix warms brightness temperatures by up to .55 K at 6 GHz. The cooling signature caused by ice scattering intensifies with increasing ice concentrations and at higher frequencies. An additional comparison to measured Convection and Moisture LA Experiment (CAMEX 3) brightness temperatures shows that in general all but, two parameterizations produce calculated T(sub B)’s that fall within the observed clear-air minima and maxima. The exceptions are for parameterizations that, enhance the scattering characteristics of frozen hydrometeors.

  • Impact of PBL and convection parameterization schemes for prediction of severe land-falling Bay of Bengal cyclones using WRF-ARW model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. S.; Bhaskaran, Prasad K.

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluates the performance of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model for prediction of land-falling Bay of Bengal (BoB) tropical cyclones (TCs). Model integration was performed using two-way interactive double nested domains at 27 and 9 km resolutions. The present study comprises two major components. Firstly, the study explores the impact of five different planetary boundary layer (PBL) and six cumulus convection (CC) schemes on seven land-falling BoB TCs. A total of 85 numerical simulations were studied in detail, and the results signify that the model simulated better both the track and intensity by using a combination of Yonsei University (YSU) PBL and the old simplified Arakawa-Schubert CC scheme. Secondly, the study also investigated the model performance based on the best possible combinations of model physics on the real-time forecasts of four BoB cyclones (Phailin, Helen, Lehar, and Madi) that made landfall during 2013 based on another 15 numerical simulations. The predicted mean track error during 2013 was about 71 km, 114 km, 133 km, 148 km, and 130 km respectively from day-1 to day-5. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) for Minimum Central Pressure (MCP) was about 6 hPa and the same noticed for Maximum Surface Wind (MSW) was about 4.5 m s-1 noticed during the entire simulation period. In addition the study also reveals that the predicted track errors during 2013 cyclones improved respectively by 43%, 44%, and 52% from day-1 to day-3 as compared to cyclones simulated during the period 2006-2011. The improvements noticed can be attributed due to relatively better quality data that was specified for the initial mean position error (about 48 km) during 2013. Overall the study signifies that the track and intensity forecast for 2013 cyclones using the specified combinations listed in the first part of this study performed relatively better than the other NWP (Numerical Weather Prediction) models, and thereby finds

  • An Investigation on the role of Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization scheme on the performance of a hydrostatic atmospheric model over a Coastal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anurose, J. T.; Subrahamanyam, Bala D.

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ocean/land-atmosphere interaction, more than half of the total kinetic energy is lost within the lowest part of atmosphere, often referred to as the planetary boundary layer (PBL). A comprehensive understanding of the energetics of this layer and turbulent processes responsible for dissipation of kinetic energy within the PBL require accurate estimation of sensible and latent heat flux and momentum flux. In numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, these quantities are estimated through different surface-layer and PBL parameterization schemes. This research article investigates different factors influencing the accuracy of a surface-layer parameterization scheme used in a hydrostatic high-resolution regional model (HRM) in the estimation of surface-layer turbulent fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum over the coastal regions of the Indian sub-continent. Results obtained from this sensitivity study of a parameterization scheme in HRM revealed the role of surface roughness length (z_{0}) in conjunction with the temperature difference between the underlying ground surface and atmosphere above (ΔT = T_{G} – T_{A}) in the estimated values of fluxes. For grid points over the land surface where z_{0} is treated as a constant throughout the model integration time, ΔT showed relative dominance in the estimation of sensible heat flux. In contrast to this, estimation of sensible and latent heat flux over ocean were found to be equally sensitive on the method adopted for assigning the values of z_{0} and also on the magnitudes of ΔT.

  • Assessment of a surface-layer parameterization scheme in an atmospheric model for varying meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anurose, T. J.; Bala Subrahamanyam, D.

    2014-06-01

    The performance of a surface-layer parameterization scheme in a high-resolution regional model (HRM) is carried out by comparing the model-simulated sensible heat flux (H) with the concurrent in situ measurements recorded at Thiruvananthapuram (8.5° N, 76.9° E), a coastal station in India. With a view to examining the role of atmospheric stability in conjunction with the roughness lengths in the determination of heat exchange coefficient (CH) and H for varying meteorological conditions, the model simulations are repeated by assigning different values to the ratio of momentum and thermal roughness lengths (i.e. z0m/z0h) in three distinct configurations of the surface-layer scheme designed for the present study. These three configurations resulted in differential behaviour for the varying meteorological conditions, which is attributed to the sensitivity of CH to the bulk Richardson number (RiB) under extremely unstable, near-neutral and stable stratification of the atmosphere.

  • STELLAR SURFACE MAGNETO-CONVECTION AS A SOURCE OF ASTROPHYSICAL NOISE. I. MULTI-COMPONENT PARAMETERIZATION OF ABSORPTION LINE PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Cegla, H. M.; Shelyag, S.; Watson, C. A.

    2013-02-15

    We outline our techniques to characterize photospheric granulation as an astrophysical noise source. A four-component parameterization of granulation is developed that can be used to reconstruct stellar line asymmetries and radial velocity shifts due to photospheric convective motions. The four components are made up of absorption line profiles calculated for granules, magnetic intergranular lanes, non-magnetic intergranular lanes, and magnetic bright points at disk center. These components are constructed by averaging Fe I 6302 A magnetically sensitive absorption line profiles output from detailed radiative transport calculations of the solar photosphere. Each of the four categories adopted is based on magnetic fieldmore » and continuum intensity limits determined from examining three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with an average magnetic flux of 200 G. Using these four-component line profiles we accurately reconstruct granulation profiles, produced from modeling 12 Multiplication-Sign 12 Mm{sup 2} areas on the solar surface, to within {approx} {+-}20 cm s{sup -1} on a {approx}100 m s{sup -1} granulation signal. We have also successfully reconstructed granulation profiles from a 50 G simulation using the parameterized line profiles from the 200 G average magnetic field simulation. This test demonstrates applicability of the characterization to a range of magnetic stellar activity levels.« less

  • Sensitivity of the forecast skill to the combination of physical parameterizations in the WRF/Chem model: A study in the Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Junior, R. S.; Rocha, R. P.; Andrade, M. F.

    2007-05-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the region of the atmosphere that suffers the direct influence of surface processes and the evolution of their characteristics during the day is of great importance for the pollutants dispersion. The aim of the present work is to analyze the most efficient combination of PBL, cumulus convection and cloud microphysics parameterizations for the forecast of the vertical profile of wind speed over Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP) that presents serious problems of atmospheric pollution. The model used was the WRF/Chem that was integrated for 48 h forecasts during one week of observational experiment that take place in the MRSP during October-November of 2006. The model domain has 72 x 48 grid points, with 18 km of resolution, centered in the MRSP. Considering a mixed-physics ensemble approach the forecasts used a combination of the parameterizations: (a) PBL the schemes of Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) and Yonsei University Scheme (YSU); (b) cumulus convections schemes of Grell-Devenyi ensemble (GDE) and Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ); (c) cloud microphysics schemes of Purdue Lin (MPL) and NCEP 5-class (MPN). The combinations tested were the following: MYJ-BMJ-MPL, MYJ-BMJ-MPN, MYJ-GDE-MPL, MYJ-GDE-MPN, YSU-BMJ-MPL, YSU-BMJ-MPN, YSU-GDE-MPL, YSU-GDE-MPN, i.e., a set of 8 previsions for day. The model initial and boundary conditions was obtained of the AVN-NCEP model. Besides this data set, the MRSP observed soundings were used to verify the WRF results. The statistical analysis considered the correlation coefficient, root mean square error, mean error between forecasts and observed wind profiles. The results showed that the most suitable combination is the YSU-GDE-MPL. This can be associated to the GDE cumulus convection scheme, which takes into consideration the entrainment process in the clouds, and also the MPL scheme that considers a larger number of classes of water phase, including the ice and mixed phases. For PBL the YSU

  • Simulated precipitation diurnal cycles over East Asia using different CAPE-based convective closure schemes in WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ben; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yaocun; Huang, Anning; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Lujun

    2018-03-01

    Closure assumption in convection parameterization is critical for reasonably modeling the precipitation diurnal variation in climate models. This study evaluates the precipitation diurnal cycles over East Asia during the summer of 2008 simulated with three convective available potential energy (CAPE) based closure assumptions, i.e. CAPE-relaxing (CR), quasi-equilibrium (QE), and free-troposphere QE (FTQE) and investigates the impacts of planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing, advection, and radiation on the simulation by using the weather research and forecasting model. The sensitivity of precipitation diurnal cycle to PBL vertical resolution is also examined. Results show that the precipitation diurnal cycles simulated with different closures all exhibit large biases over land and the simulation with FTQE closure agrees best with observation. In the simulation with QE closure, the intensified PBL mixing after sunrise is responsible for the late-morning peak of convective precipitation, while in the simulation with FTQE closure, convective precipitation is mainly controlled by advection cooling. The relative contributions of different processes to precipitation formation are functions of rainfall intensity. In the simulation with CR closure, the dynamical equilibrium in the free troposphere still can be reached, implying the complex cause-effect relationship between atmospheric motion and convection. For simulations in which total CAPE is consumed for the closures, daytime precipitation decreases with increased PBL resolution because thinner model layer produces lower convection starting layer, leading to stronger downdraft cooling and CAPE consumption. The sensitivity of the diurnal peak time of precipitation to closure assumption can also be modulated by changes in PBL vertical resolution. The results of this study help us better understand the impacts of various processes on the precipitation diurnal cycle simulation.

  • Revisiting the latent heat nudging scheme for the rainfall assimilation of a simulated convective storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, D.; Rossa, A.

    2007-12-01

    Next-generation, operational, high-resolution numerical weather prediction models require economical assimilation schemes for radar data. In the present study we evaluate and characterise the latent heat nudging (LHN) rainfall assimilation scheme within a meso-γ scale NWP model in the framework of identical twin simulations of an idealised supercell storm. Consideration is given to the model’s dynamical response to the forcing as well as to the sensitivity of the LHN scheme to uncertainty in the observations and the environment. The results indicate that the LHN scheme is well able to capture the dynamical structure and the right rainfall amount of the storm in a perfect environment. This holds true even in degraded environments but a number of important issues arise. In particular, changes in the low-level humidity field are found to affect mainly the precipitation amplitude during the assimilation with a fast adaptation of the storm to the system dynamics determined by the environment during the free forecast. A constant bias in the environmental wind field, on the other hand, has the potential to render a successful assimilation with the LHN scheme difficult, as the velocity of the forcing is not consistent with the system propagation speed determined by the wind. If the rainfall forcing moves too fast, the system propagation is supported and the assimilated storm and forecasts initialised therefrom develop properly. A too slow forcing, on the other hand, can decelerate the system and eventually disturb the system dynamics by decoupling the low-level moisture inflow from the main updrafts during the assimilation. This distortion is sustained in the free forecast. It has further been found that a sufficient temporal resolution of the rainfall input is crucial for the successful assimilation of a fast moving, coherent convective storm and that the LHN scheme, when applied to a convective storm, appears to necessitate a careful tuning.

  • New Concepts for Refinement of Cumulus Parameterization in GCM’s the Arakawa-Schubert Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Lau, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art models including the one employed in this study use the Arakawa-Schubert framework for moist convection, and Sundqvist formulation of stratiform. clouds, for moist physics, in-cloud condensation, and precipitation. Despite a variety of cloud parameterization methodologies developed by several modelers including the authors, most of the parameterized cloud-models have similar deficiencies. These consist of: (a) not enough shallow clouds, (b) too many deep clouds; (c) several layers of clouds in a vertically demoralized model as opposed to only a few levels of observed clouds, and (d) higher than normal incidence of double ITCZ (Inter-tropical Convergence Zone). Even after several upgrades consisting of a sophisticated cloud-microphysics and sub-grid scale orographic precipitation into the Data Assimilation Office (DAO)’s atmospheric model (called GEOS-2 GCM) at two different resolutions, we found that the above deficiencies remained persistent. The two empirical solutions often used to counter the aforestated deficiencies consist of a) diffusion of moisture and heat within the lower troposphere to artificially force the shallow clouds; and b) arbitrarily invoke evaporation of in-cloud water for low-level clouds. Even though helpful, these implementations lack a strong physical rationale. Our research shows that two missing physical conditions can ameliorate the aforestated cloud-parameterization deficiencies. First, requiring an ascending cloud airmass to be saturated at its starting point will not only make the cloud instantly buoyant all through its ascent, but also provide the essential work function (buoyancy energy) that would promote more shallow clouds. Second, we argue that training clouds that are unstable to a finite vertical displacement, even if neutrally buoyant in their ambient environment, must continue to rise and entrain causing evaporation of in-cloud water. These concepts have not been invoked in any of the cloud

  • Studying Precipitation Processes in WRF with Goddard Bulk Microphysics in Comparison with Other Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Shi, J.J.; Braun, S.; Simpson, J.; Chen, S.S.; Lang, S.; Hong, S.Y.; Thompson, G.; Peters-Lidard, C.

    2009-01-01

    A Goddard bulk microphysical parameterization is implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This bulk microphysical scheme has three different options, 2ICE (cloud ice & snow), 3ICE-graupel (cloud ice, snow & graupel) and 3ICE-hail (cloud ice, snow & hail). High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on different weather events: a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atlantic hurricane. The results suggest that microphysics has a major impact on the organization and precipitation processes associated with a summer midlatitude convective line system. The Goddard 3ICE scheme with the cloud ice-snow-hail configuration agreed better with observations ill of rainfall intensity and having a narrow convective line than did simulations with the cloud ice-snow-graupel and cloud ice-snow (i.e., 2ICE) configurations. This is because the Goddard 3ICE-hail configuration has denser precipitating ice particles (hail) with very fast fall speeds (over 10 m/s) For an Atlantic hurricane case, the Goddard microphysical scheme (with 3ICE-hail, 3ICE-graupel and 2ICE configurations) had no significant impact on the track forecast but did affect the intensity slightly. The Goddard scheme is also compared with WRF’s three other 3ICE bulk microphysical schemes: WSM6, Purdue-Lin and Thompson. For the summer midlatitude convective line system, all of the schemes resulted in simulated precipitation events that were elongated in southwest-northeast direction in qualitative agreement with the observed feature. However, the Goddard 3ICE-hail and Thompson schemes were closest to the observed rainfall intensities although the Goddard scheme simulated more heavy rainfall (over 48 mm/h). For the Atlantic hurricane case, none of the schemes had a significant impact on the track forecast; however, the simulated intensity using the Purdue-Lin scheme was much stronger than the other schemes. The vertical distributions of

  • Improving the Representation of Snow Crystal Properties Within a Single-Moment Microphysics Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Petersen, Walter A.; Case, Jonathan L.; Dembek, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    As computational resources continue their expansion, weather forecast models are transitioning to the use of parameterizations that predict the evolution of hydrometeors and their microphysical processes, rather than estimating the bulk effects of clouds and precipitation that occur on a sub-grid scale. These parameterizations are referred to as single-moment, bulk water microphysics schemes, as they predict the total water mass among hydrometeors in a limited number of classes. Although the development of single moment microphysics schemes have often been driven by the need to predict the structure of convective storms, they may also provide value in predicting accumulations of snowfall. Predicting the accumulation of snowfall presents unique challenges to forecasters and microphysics schemes. In cases where surface temperatures are near freezing, accumulated depth often depends upon the snowfall rate and the ability to overcome an initial warm layer. Precipitation efficiency relates to the dominant ice crystal habit, as dendrites and plates have relatively large surface areas for the accretion of cloud water and ice, but are only favored within a narrow range of ice supersaturation and temperature. Forecast models and their parameterizations must accurately represent the characteristics of snow crystal populations, such as their size distribution, bulk density and fall speed. These properties relate to the vertical distribution of ice within simulated clouds, the temperature profile through latent heat release, and the eventual precipitation rate measured at the surface. The NASA Goddard, single-moment microphysics scheme is available to the operational forecast community as an option within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The NASA Goddard scheme predicts the occurrence of up to six classes of water mass: vapor, cloud ice, cloud water, rain, snow and either graupel or hail.

  • Evaluation of Surface Flux Parameterizations with Long-Term ARM Observations

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Gang; Liu, Yangang; Endo, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    Surface momentum, sensible heat, and latent heat fluxes are critical for atmospheric processes such as clouds and precipitation, and are parameterized in a variety of models ranging from cloud-resolving models to large-scale weather and climate models. However, direct evaluation of the parameterization schemes for these surface fluxes is rare due to limited observations. This study takes advantage of the long-term observations of surface fluxes collected at the Southern Great Plains site by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program to evaluate the six surface flux parameterization schemes commonly used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and threemore » U.S. general circulation models (GCMs). The unprecedented 7-yr-long measurements by the eddy correlation (EC) and energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) methods permit statistical evaluation of all six parameterizations under a variety of stability conditions, diurnal cycles, and seasonal variations. The statistical analyses show that the momentum flux parameterization agrees best with the EC observations, followed by latent heat flux, sensible heat flux, and evaporation ratio/Bowen ratio. The overall performance of the parameterizations depends on atmospheric stability, being best under neutral stratification and deteriorating toward both more stable and more unstable conditions. Further diagnostic analysis reveals that in addition to the parameterization schemes themselves, the discrepancies between observed and parameterized sensible and latent heat fluxes may stem from inadequate use of input variables such as surface temperature, moisture availability, and roughness length. The results demonstrate the need for improving the land surface models and measurements of surface properties, which would permit the evaluation of full land surface models.« less

  • Understanding tropical upper tropospheric warming: The role of SSTs, convective parameterizations, and observational uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po-Chedley, S.; Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has compared CMIP5 general circulation model (GCM) simulations with satellite observations of warming in the tropical upper troposphere relative to the lower-middle troposphere. Although the pattern of SST warming is important, this research demonstrated that models overestimate increases in static stability between the mid- to upper- tropical troposphere, even when they are forced with historical sea surface temperatures. This discrepancy between satellite-borne microwave sounding unit measurements (MSU) and GCMs is important because it has implications for the strength of the lapse rate and water vapor feedback. The apparent model-observational difference for changes in static stability in the tropical upper troposphere represents an important problem, but it is not clear whether the difference is a result of common biases in GCMs, biases in observational datasets, or both. In this work, we will use GCM simulations to examine the importance of the spatial pattern of SST warming and different convective parameterizations in determining the lapse rate changes in tropical troposphere. We will also consider uncertainties in MSU satellite observations, including changes in the diurnal sampling of temperature and instrument calibration biases when comparing GCMs with the observed record.

  • Sensitivity of a global climate model to the critical Richardson number in the boundary layer parameterization

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yangang; Gao, Zhiqiu; …

    2015-04-27

    The critical bulk Richardson number (Ri cr) is an important parameter in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes used in many climate models. This paper examines the sensitivity of a Global Climate Model, the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model, BCC_AGCM to Ri cr. The results show that the simulated global average of PBL height increases nearly linearly with Ri cr, with a change of about 114 m for a change of 0.5 in Ri cr. The surface sensible (latent) heat flux decreases (increases) as Ri cr increases. The influence of Ri cr on surface air temperature and specificmore » humidity is not significant. The increasing Ri cr may affect the location of the Westerly Belt in the Southern Hemisphere. Further diagnosis reveals that changes in Ri cr affect stratiform and convective precipitations differently. Increasing Ri cr leads to an increase in the stratiform precipitation but a decrease in the convective precipitation. Significant changes of convective precipitation occur over the inter-tropical convergence zone, while changes of stratiform precipitation mostly appear over arid land such as North Africa and Middle East.« less

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